Thursday, September 08, 2005

Grover Norquist: One Face of Conservativism

Back when the U.S. began it's ill-planned attempt to dismantle Iraq's large stockpiles of WMD, the House Majority Leader stated that "Nothing is more important in the face of a war than cutting taxes." I take Tom Delay and his anti-tax conservatives serious when that statement is uttered. To Tom Delay conservatives, then, it's more important to cut taxes than to, say, fully equip troops or provide veterans with well deserved benefits. (Wouldn't it have been more appropriate to debate the funding situation of the troops than a dangerous tax cut?)

We should not forget that the anti-tax coalition is a large block of today's conservatives. Incidentally, they also happen to make up a significant portion of the GOP constituency and fundraisers. Since they (anti-tax gurus) think debating tax cuts are more important than debating how much armor troops should have, it should not be a suprise that the anti-tax crusaders are out to push through another tax cut. Or should I say, "economic stimulus package" or "job creation plan". Is there anything more important in a time of national catastrophe and thousands of dead Americans than cutting taxes?

Thomas Friedman has "kinder" words than I to one of the king-pins of the anti-tax crusade, Grover Norquist:
An administration whose tax policy has been dominated by the toweringly selfish Grover Norquist - who has been quoted as saying: "I don't want to abolish government. I simply want to reduce it to the size where I can drag it into the bathroom and drown it in the bathtub" - doesn't have the instincts for this moment. Mr. Norquist is the only person about whom I would say this: I hope he owns property around the New Orleans levee that was never properly finished because of a lack of tax dollars. I hope his basement got flooded. And I hope that he was busy drowning government in his bathtub when the levee broke and that he had to wait for a U.S. Army helicopter to get out of town.
I'll have more to say about conservativism, but we should remember that the anti-tax aspect of conservative philosophy will leave us ill prepared to completely support our troops with supplies, to help in times of national tragedy that we now face, to get health insurance to children...the list goes on. This is a fundamental consequence of the anti-tax conservative philosophy rampant in today's GOP. People are free to embrace that philosophy, but they also have to accept it's consequences. (Bill Clinton contradicted the claim that raising taxes yields less national revenue. Even Raegan had to raise taxes after his tax cuts failed to live up to the hype.)

3 Comments:

At September 08, 2005 11:33 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

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At September 13, 2005 11:44 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Our troops shouldnt have supplies because we shouldnt have any troops. Health insurance is a commodity that would be more affordable without the beareuacratic regulation. National tragedy's are usually CAUSED by our government (9-11), and remember that the levees broke in New Orleans b/c they were built by the Army Engineers with no profit motive...INSTEAD of by a private firm.

Taxation is confiscation, and even if the stolen money buys shit that you want, it doesnt change that fact. You look to government as your answer while remaining totally ignorant of the free market and the benefits of idividual economic calculation vs public calculation.

 
At September 13, 2005 5:19 PM, Blogger Gilbert Martinez said...

Hey smart, guy/gal: would there be such a thing as "money" without government. And what would prevent people from taking it from you without rules?

This complete lack of any historical sense. Or even factual: the levee project funding was cut by anti-government people; Halliburton has done a horrible job at numerous things. Drug companies have produced shoddy drugs recently. The truth is, without a balance of public and private systems, everything would stall.

I'd love to continue a serious discussion on government, but it's not worth the time responding to comments my 5th grade niece can refute.

 

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